1. SPS Accounts:
    Do you find yourself coming back time after time? Do you appreciate the ongoing hard work to keep this community focused and successful in its mission? Please consider supporting us by upgrading to an SPS Account. Besides the warm and fuzzy feeling that comes from supporting a good cause, you'll also get a significant number of ever-expanding perks and benefits on the site and the forums. Click here to find out more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
You are currently viewing Boards o' Magick as a guest, but you can register an account here. Registration is fast, easy and free. Once registered you will have access to search the forums, create and respond to threads, PM other members, upload screenshots and access many other features unavailable to guests.

BoM cultivates a friendly and welcoming atmosphere. We have been aiming for quality over quantity with our forums from their inception, and believe that this distinction is truly tangible and valued by our members. We'd love to have you join us today!

(If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us. If you've forgotten your username or password, click here.)

Recommend a fantasy book

Discussion in 'Booktalk' started by Oaz, Jun 24, 2006.

  1. Oaz Gems: 29/31
    Latest gem: Glittering Beljuril


    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2001
    Messages:
    3,140
    Likes Received:
    0
    Okay, so first things first -- I don't read fantasy. This is partly because Tolkein bored me and Salvatore disappointed me, and also because I feel stupid carry around fantasy when the guy next to me at the university is reading Vonnegut or Steinbeck. But I've decided to pick up a fantasy book -- the kind that can be fully read within a week or two. So give me something.

    But one or two guidelines, more or less:
    -No seminal works -- e.g. Lord of the Rings
    -Recent work -- published in the last couple of years.
    -Nothing targeted to "young adults".

    'preciate it.
     
  2. joacqin

    joacqin Confused Jerk Adored Veteran Pillars of Eternity SP Immortalizer (for helping immortalize Sorcerer's Place in the game!)

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2001
    Messages:
    6,117
    Media:
    2
    Likes Received:
    121
    As I have said to everyone, George RR Martin, Robin Hobb and Steven Erikson are great reads which entertains and challenges the reader and in my opionion up to par with any "real" literature when it comes to quality.
     
  3. Barmy Army

    Barmy Army Simple mind, simple pleasures... Adored Veteran

    Joined:
    May 26, 2003
    Messages:
    6,586
    Media:
    2
    Likes Received:
    162
    Robin Hobb's Farseer Trilogy first, then her Liveship Traders, then the Tawny Man trilogy.

    That'll keep you busy for a bit.
     
  4. Enagonios Gems: 31/31
    Latest gem: Rogue Stone


    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2001
    Messages:
    6,089
    Likes Received:
    5
    I agree with everything already mentioned except Erikson, haven't been able to read his stuff yet. Also try Neil Gaiman's stuff if you don't want to commit to a series. Neverwhere, American Gods and Anansi Boys were awesome. Although Coraline and Stardust were targeting a younger audience, they're very good too.
     
  5. Harbourboy

    Harbourboy Take thy form from off my door! Veteran Pillars of Eternity SP Immortalizer (for helping immortalize Sorcerer's Place in the game!)

    Joined:
    May 29, 2003
    Messages:
    13,341
    Likes Received:
    95
    What Joacquin said. Steven Erikson, George R R Martin, and Robin Hobb are writing the best quality fantasy fiction around at the moment. Definitely not targetted at young adults, but I'm not sure what you mean by seminal.
     
  6. Enagonios Gems: 31/31
    Latest gem: Rogue Stone


    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2001
    Messages:
    6,089
    Likes Received:
    5
    Probably means boring like Tolkien's Silmarillion :sleep: :p
     
  7. Aikanaro Gems: 31/31
    Latest gem: Rogue Stone


    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2001
    Messages:
    5,521
    Likes Received:
    20
    *Slaps the people who think that Tolkien is boring*

    But anyway - I'd recommend Stardust by Neil Gaiman first off, then probably The Farseer Trilogy by Robin Hobb.

    Robin Hobb has a very page-turning writing style, so you probably don't need to worry about being bored with her.

    Stardust ... well, it depends on how you read it as to whether it fits your criteria. It's basically a fairy tale for adults - whether that sounds too 'young adult' or not for you I couldn't say. I wouldn't say that it's aimed at a younger audience than his other books though... (while Coraline definately is)
     
  8. Enagonios Gems: 31/31
    Latest gem: Rogue Stone


    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2001
    Messages:
    6,089
    Likes Received:
    5
    Point taken :p

    Yeah, Stardust isn't really aimed at a "young" audience. It is, as you said, a kind of fairy tale for adults. Classical fantasy and fairy tale elements showed in a different way to appeal to adults. I loved it, but some people may find it to "kiddy" for them before getting into it.
     
  9. DarkStrider

    DarkStrider I've seen the future and it has seen me Distinguished Member ★ SPS Account Holder

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2005
    Messages:
    4,321
    Likes Received:
    2
    Wow you people are so mainstream in recommendations, I would go for

    Jack L Chalker - Well World series, Flux and Anchor Series
    Louise Cooper - Master of Time trilogy
    Glen Cook - Black Company series
    Eliazabeth Moon - Deed of Paksenarrion
    Barbara Hambly - Silicon Mage series
    Michael Scott Rohan - Winter of Ice series
    David Gemmell - The Drenai series, The Sipstrassi Series

    That should give you a few alternatives to the mainstream
     
  10. Harbourboy

    Harbourboy Take thy form from off my door! Veteran Pillars of Eternity SP Immortalizer (for helping immortalize Sorcerer's Place in the game!)

    Joined:
    May 29, 2003
    Messages:
    13,341
    Likes Received:
    95
    That's why they call it mainstream, because lots of people like it.
     
  11. Enagonios Gems: 31/31
    Latest gem: Rogue Stone


    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2001
    Messages:
    6,089
    Likes Received:
    5
    good one HB :D

    @DS

    They're good that's why they're recommended :p The only author you listed that I've read is David Gemmel and while his stuff is pretty entertaining it's nowhere near the caliber of the authors that we listed.
     
  12. DarkStrider

    DarkStrider I've seen the future and it has seen me Distinguished Member ★ SPS Account Holder

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2005
    Messages:
    4,321
    Likes Received:
    2
    @Enag I'm not saying they're not good, I would have recommended Robin Hobb's books. But I wouldn't recommend Erikson as I haven't read him yet, and I certainly wouldn't recommend Martin's books as I don't like his writing style. To say that any author's work is not of the same calibre as another's is a judgment that is relative. :p
     
  13. Enagonios Gems: 31/31
    Latest gem: Rogue Stone


    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2001
    Messages:
    6,089
    Likes Received:
    5
    Very true. But Gemmel has written, imo, the crappiest ending I've ever read in Dark Moon :D :p

    The book was great then BAM! the end and you're thinking.. wtf? :confused:
     
  14. Chandos the Red

    Chandos the Red This Wheel's on Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2003
    Messages:
    8,252
    Media:
    82
    Likes Received:
    238
    Gender:
    Male
    A large portion of Erikson has not been published in the US as of yet, so he can't be all that mainstream.

    But I would definitely recommend Erickson, but not so much Martin. I would also recommend Gerg Keyes' Kingdom of Thorn and Bone.
     
  15. AMaster Gems: 26/31
    Latest gem: Diamond


    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2000
    Messages:
    2,495
    Media:
    1
    Likes Received:
    50
    Agreed. That book convinced me to never read a second Gemmel novel.

    Anywho. I'll add a "ditto" to the recomendations for Erikson, Martin, and Hobb. Those three'll keep you busy for a good, long while.
     
  16. The mad haggis Gems: 4/31
    Latest gem: Sunstone


    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dark moon did have a crap ending, but Gemmill has a habit of killing off main characters. Which is a pretty gutsy move. Most of his stuff is really good IMHO. Pllus some deaths are great. Like Druss in Legend.
     
  17. Faraaz Gems: 26/31
    Latest gem: Diamond


    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2003
    Messages:
    2,403
    Likes Received:
    0
    @Oaz: Martin pwns all!! :D Seriously...read it.

    His work is completely different and his stories work with the plot, and not any fantasy stereotypes...I'm not putting this across very well, but trust me. You will never know what to expect with his books. And its always for the good...

    PS: Its a bit hardcore though, so if you don't have the inclination to read some pretty full on violence and othersuch stuff then you might want to skip it...
     
  18. auril Gems: 2/31
    Latest gem: Fire Agate


    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    Salvatore's books are for 10 year old boys. Tolkien's books are for the educated. Vonnegut is overated.
     
  19. Enagonios Gems: 31/31
    Latest gem: Rogue Stone


    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2001
    Messages:
    6,089
    Likes Received:
    5
    heh. i wouldn't put it like that. salvatore's stuff can be enjoyable. and (yeah, yeah i'm ready for y'all :p ) aside from LotR Tolkien is just okay. The Silmarillion sucked major ass, it was like reading the bible (apologies to whoever feels he needs one re: bible, no need to take me up on this because I just don't care). but to reiterate, if you're looking for consistency, then martin, hobb, gaiman and pratchett.
     
  20. el timtor Gems: 13/31
    Latest gem: Ziose


    Veteran

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2004
    Messages:
    500
    Likes Received:
    0
    Roger Zelazny - The Chronicles of Amber.

    The first five books of the series are better IMO than the second five.

    And I'll probably get sharp things and rotten produce thrown at me, but the early volumes (1-3) of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time are decent reading.
     
Sorcerer's Place is a project run entirely by fans and for fans. Maintaining Sorcerer's Place and a stable environment for all our hosted sites requires a substantial amount of our time and funds on a regular basis, so please consider supporting us to keep the site up & running smoothly. Thank you!

Sorcerers.net is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to products on amazon.com, amazon.ca and amazon.co.uk. Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates.