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A latin phrase

Discussion in 'Whatnots' started by Mollusken, Aug 1, 2004.

  1. Mollusken Gems: 24/31
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    Is there anybody here who knows latin? If you do, please you tell me what "Sit luceat lux" means. It's the name of a trance track from the Hi-Quality music competition at The Gathering 2001 (the most awesome LAN party of all times), and after 3 1/2 years I still wonder what it means.
     
  2. Oxymore Gems: 13/31
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    It's rather "Sic luceat lux" in my humble opinion, and it must be translate into somehing along the lines of:
    "Thus shines the light"
     
  3. Mollusken Gems: 24/31
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    Thanks. And by the way, and friend of mine found this really great site with latin phrases for all occasions.
     
  4. chevalier

    chevalier Knight of Everfull Chalice ★ SPS Account Holder Veteran

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    It definitely can't be "sit" and can only be "sic". It means "may thus shine the light".
     
  5. SleepleSS Gems: 24/31
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    That site is so cool! Thanx!
     
  6. chevalier

    chevalier Knight of Everfull Chalice ★ SPS Account Holder Veteran

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    Those sites are fun, but be aware they may contain mistakes or "approximate" translations. If you're ever going to use any of such phrases in a serious way, I suggest you ask someone who knows the language. A dictionary won't be enough as words in Latin decline and conjugate, which seems to escape those sites' webmasters sometimes.
     
  7. Enagonios Gems: 31/31
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    i always liked the one they used in gladiator, i forget the latin translation, but in english it goes "We who are about to die, salute you".
     
  8. chevalier

    chevalier Knight of Everfull Chalice ★ SPS Account Holder Veteran

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    The original phrase is "morituri te salutant". It means "those who are about to die salute you". Don't know why it's typically translated as "we" etc. It would have to be "morituri te salutamus" for that.
     
  9. SleepleSS Gems: 24/31
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    @ Chev
    Maybe you're the one that can finally tell me what:

    "Baring Lunar Curvature" means Lunar refers to to Moon right? but that's as far as I get...
     
  10. chevalier

    chevalier Knight of Everfull Chalice ★ SPS Account Holder Veteran

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    Yeah, lunar is of the moon.
     
  11. SleepleSS Gems: 24/31
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    But that still leaves us with "Baring" What the hell is Baring???

    edit:
    When I type Baring in Google I see dogs (Mostly naked)girls and a few old men...
     
  12. chevalier

    chevalier Knight of Everfull Chalice ★ SPS Account Holder Veteran

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    Must be from the verb to bare or to expose. To expose the curvature of the moon, probably.
     
  13. SleepleSS Gems: 24/31
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    I found out there is a painter called Laura Baring-Gould. Since the line I mentioned is followed by:

    "Like Canvas for a lick of pain" (Quite probably an adaption of like canvas for a lick of paint) Maybe the line refers to her...

    But chev, you can be right to...I found an articel about "Breast Baring" That could explane the topless women I found when typing Baring. To expose breasts in art...
     
  14. Faerus Stoneslammer Gems: 16/31
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    Uhh....SleepleSS; are you sure you're quote there doesn't just mean "exposing the curvature of the moon"? (like chev said...) The words are all english...

    And I was wondering also about the Latin words for "Father, Son and Holy Spirit" and their proper spelling. I've seen a few different ways of spelling the Latin words; but I don't know which form is correct (I assume "Patri, Fili and Spiritu Sancti to be the correct words...but I'm not sure).

    Oh yeah; and can anyone tell me the Latin word for the verb "to serve"?
     
  15. chevalier

    chevalier Knight of Everfull Chalice ★ SPS Account Holder Veteran

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    Latin nouns decline. This means that where in English you would just add a preposition, in Latin you have to change the ending of the noun with or without adding a preposition.

    Nominative: Pater, Filius et Spiritus Sanctus
    Genitive: Patris, Filii et Spiritus Sancti
    Dative: Patri, Filio et Spiritui Sancto
    Accusative: Patrem, Filium et Spiritum Sanctum
    Ablative: Patre, Filio et Spiritu Sancto
    Vocative: Pater, Fili et Spiritus Sancte

    "To seve" is servo, servare. Bad news, it conjugates, meaning each person has a different ending. And then there are tenses and genders :evil:
     
  16. SleepleSS Gems: 24/31
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    Yess Faerus I think your right I just never heard the word Curvature before and I thought it was latin But after Chev's reply I took a dictionary to find out it indeed was plain english, my mistake!
     
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